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Dublin City Hall

A masterpiece of the civic Georgian architecture for which Dublin is renowned.

TravelCurious Tip

The rotunda is sometimes booked out for weddings on Saturdays – if you are unlucky enough to arrive on such an occasion then be prepared to have your access limited.

A Den of Vice

This site next to Dublin Castle at the top of Parliament Street was not always occupied by so prestigious and grand a building as the City Hall. In the mid-1700s a tavern called The Eagle became the sordid hangout of the Earl of Rosse’s infamous Hellfire Club, whose drunken, debaucherous and occasionally diabolical revelries became the stuff of Dublin legend. These days, the sex and satanism have been toned down but the location is no less widely renowned.


A Celebrated Restoration

Designed by Thomas Cooley and completed in 1779, Dublin City Hall marked the introduction to Ireland of the European neoclassical architectural style, and remains an exquisite example of it. When it was converted into a government building in the mid-1800s, the team tasked with overseeing the alterations to the building created a number of unsightly additions to the structure which ruined its overall aesthetic effect. Thankfully, an award-winning restoration program in the early 21st century has returned City Hall to its former Georgian splendour.


Trading Places

After paying a €4 entry fee, you are admitted into the rotunda, a spectacular entrance hall crowned by a large dome, which is supported by 12 marble columns. You can wander between the columns, over the gorgeous floor mosaics and around the ambulatory surrounding the rotunda, and your footsteps will follow those of the merchants who once discussed business in this place over 200 years ago.

In the vaults downstairs there is a multimedia exhibition detailing the history of Dublin from the Anglo-Norman invasion of 1170 to the present day. For an entry of only €2, it is well worth a visit.



Nearby Attractions

See all attractions in Dublin
Temple Bar
A lively cultural and creative quarter on the south bank of the River Liffey.
Dublin Castle
Originally built to defend Norman Dublin, this handsome castle is now the city's historic heart.
Christ Church Cathedral
Dublin's photogenic eldest cathedral has been a place of worship for nearly 1000 years.
Dame Street
Located on the eastern edge of the medieval city, this busy street takes its name from a large dam that was constructed here in the medieval period.
Dublin local pubs
There are currently 751 pubs in Dublin's city! Take a beer in one of its historical pubs also great spots for live music.
George's Street Arcade
Victorian style red-bricked indoor market located at Dublin's city centre.

Related Tours

The True Dublin Experience: Private Irish Pub Culture Tour
Immerse yourself in the authentic Irish pub culture and discover traditional and friendly places where locals enjoy Irish music, sports,  and homemade food while enjoying a pint of Guinness. On this Irish Pub Culture Walking Tour, you will: 

  • Visit 3 traditional Irish pubs in Dublin with your private guide.
  • Sample local beerscraft beers, and ciders.
  • Discover the literary and political connections of some of the most famous pubs in Dublin
  • Hear live traditional Irish music for an authentic Irish Pub Culture experience.
  • Learn about Ireland’s most famous beer, Guinness, and the family legacy which carries on today.
Get better acquainted with the culture, history and stories of the Irish capital whilst having a drink in some of the best pubs in Dublin! 

Dublin is where pubs were born, each with its own unique atmosphere and long and varied history. Their authenticity has given Irish pubs a reputation for being fun, friendly and welcoming all over the world, but they quintessentially belong to Dublin. There is no other such suitable place to sip on a pint of Guinness. This tour is a mixture of novelty, history, literature, music and humour!

Venture to Dublin's true hidden gems --including the pubs which contributed most to the city's unique character. Not only will you learn how to savour a pint of beer, but also follow in the footsteps of Irish literary giants, seeing the haunts frequented by the likes of James Joyce. 

You will also learn how to properly enjoy a Guinness while learning about the rich cultural heritage which led to its creation.   And remember, most importantly: you should only drink your Guinness when you can see a clear division between the white foam and the dark beer. If the beer in your glass still looks murky and brown, your Guinness isn't ready yet! 

Please note: Due to varying age restrictions in pubs, this tour is suitable for those 18 and over. No children are allowed on this tour. If you wish to go on a pub tour where you may also bring children, please be in touch with our team.
The Road to Independence: Private Walking Tour of Dublin
Explore some of the most important sites of the Easter Uprising of 1916 in the beautiful city of Dublin, independent Ireland's capital city. See the scenes of fierce fighting, the statues of rebel leaders on O'Connell street and the rebels' HQ at the General Post Office – end at the moving Gardens of Remembrance. On your private tour you will:

  • Enjoy the personal attention of your expert, local private guide.
  • Learn about Ireland’s long road to independence from Britain, and the many significant figures who played key roles in fighting for it, from Victorian politicians, doctors and priests, to the leaders of the Easter Uprising in 1916.
  • Learn about the Uprising that took place in the middle of the First World war, and how it was brutally and swiftly crushed by British soldiers.
  • See the General Post Office, where Patrick Pearse read aloud the Proclamation of Irish Independence in 1916 – effectively kickstarting the Easter Rising. It became the rebel headquarters, the scene of a bloody five-day siege, and the site of their final surrender. 
  • Learn about the uprising’s failed attempt to capture Dublin Castle at the start of the conflict.
  • Relive the intense struggle that took place in the City Hall, and hear about the horrific police brutality. 
  • See the Shelbourne Hotel, where the Irish Constitution was drafted in 1922.
  • Walk up O'Connell Street, lined with statues of the men who outspokenly called and fought for Irish independence, starting with Daniel O’Connell (1775 – 1847) who organised many hundreds of non-violent protests and demanded civil rights for Irish Catholics in the British Parliament.
  • Notice how many of the pedestals of these Irish heroes of independence are pockmarked with bullet holes, from the violence of the 1916 rebellion.
  • Hear the life stories of the many figures of Irish Independence whose statues line the road, from James Larkin founder of the Irish Transport and General Workers Union, whose strike in 1913 is considered the ‘first shot’ in the 1916 uprising, to figures from the 19th century like Father Theobald Matthew and Charles Stewart Parnell, who nearly won ‘home rule’ in the 1880s.
  • Finish your tour at the Gardens of Remembrance, where the lives of all the Irishmen who died in the struggle for independence are commemorated.

While the fight for Irish independence or ‘Home rule’ had long been fought for, the Easter uprising of 1916 was a definitive moment in the history of Ireland and its long road to independence from the British. The rebellion took place in the middle of the First World War and was brutally suppressed by the British army. It paved the way for the election of Arthur Griffith as the president of a new nation six years later. 

In this three-hour private walking tour, you will explore the most significant sites of the Easter Uprising in Dublin, while learning all about the history of the Emerald Isle and its turbulent, often violent relationship with Britain. Hear about the events that led to the Easter Uprising, its defeat and the fallout from it. 

Visit the General Post Office—the headquarters where the rebels declared Ireland a republic and raised the flag—to the City Hall, where fierce fighting took place. You will learn about the failed rebel attempt to capture Dublin Castle at the start of the conflict. 

After walking up O’Connell Street, lined with the statues of those who made significant contributions to the fight for Independence, you will end the tour at the Garden of Remembrance, where the lives of all the Irishmen who fought for freedom are commemorated. The memorial was placed on the site where rebel leaders of the Uprising were held before their execution. Above you’ll see the Irish flag, with the green colour representing Catholics, orange for protestants and white: a symbol of hope, that both can live together in peace. In 2011, Queen Elizabeth II visited the site, the first by a British monarch in 100 years. She laid a wreath of Remembrance and bowed her head. A deeply moving and healing moment for both countries. 
Dublin's Best Whiskey Tasting Experience; Group Tour
Adventure towards the historical drinking hubs of Dublin social life, and experiment with some of Irelands finest whiskies. 

  • Visit three historical pubs 
  • Learn about the social culture of drinking in Dublin 
  • Sample five tasting whiskies 
Irish whiskey dates back more than 1,000 years, when Irish monks began making their own “uisce beatha”.  In 1608, The Old Bushmills Distillery in Co Antrim became Ireland first licensed distillery. By the middle of the 18th century, there were more than 1,000 registered distilleries in Ireland, as demand for whiskey reached saturation levels. In the 19th century, Irish whiskey sales were badly hit by the Temperence movement and the Great Famine. Whiskey exports thrived, however, and America in particular was fast falling in love with the smooth nectar from the ould sod. In the early 20th century, Ireland was fighting a War of Independence, and Irish whiskey became a major casualty. Prohibition in the US also badly hit exports.  Scottish distillers were quick to seize the opportunity, and Scotch soon overtook Irish as the world’s favourite whiskey. In 1987, John Teeling launched Cooley Distillery, the first independent distillery in 100 years, marking the beginning of a renaissance for Irish whiskey. 

Irish whiskey is now the fastest-growing premium spirit category in the world, and Whiskey tourism is growing in Ireland, too, with 814,000 people visiting Irish whiskey attractions in 2017. 
Private Walking Tour of Dublin with a Local
Travel isn’t just about travel, it’s people, faces, food and cultures, fresh perspectives, discoveries and different ways of life - it’s about uncovering the city’s soul. It’s about connection. On your private, guided tour of Dublin with a local

  • Enjoy meaningful insights and Irish humour with a Dubliner
  • Hear how locals describe Dublin - the experiences that have shaped their worldview, including Brexit and the ‘open-border question.
  • Spend a few hours walking around the city’s highlights - including St Stephen's GreenDublin Castle, and O'Connell Street, with a private, local guide.
  • When open to the public, pop into famed Trinity College, and hear about the famous alumni who have walked its halls.
  • Pick up invaluable recommendations on off-the-beaten-tracks pubs, advice, and tips on finding the best whiskies.
  • Finish your tour over a pint of Guinness - or a coffee or tea- in your local guide’s favourite haunt.
Ireland’s compact capital - with its vibrant, historical and beautiful streets - has witnessed everything from the Great Famine to the fight for Irish Freedom. In a city made for walking, easily navigable districts make orientation a breeze, but even if you get lost, the locals are some of the friendliest you will find in the world. The annual St. Patrick's Day Parade attracts millions of revellers to Irish folk songs and Cèilidh dancing, but in Dublin, there are free-flowing pints of “the black stuff” and live music year-round in lively watering holes.

Enjoying a private, guided tour with a local will help you discover the side streets and stories often missed. Hear the intriguing backstories and learn the backstories and neighbourhood rumours which bring Dublin to life, from the revolution over a century ago to the country’s current relationship with mainland Europe and the United Kingdom

There are no substitutes for anecdotes and first-hand insight – which is why we’ve built this tour: so that you can have a Dubliner's knowledge to help you swerve tourist traps, lengthy queues and over-priced nonsense. While you walk the city, you’ll uncover its authenticity through the eyes of a Dubliner. Your tour is immersive - bringing meaningful and like-minded interesting people together that would never meet if you stuck to the main tourist drag. Experience the world-famous Irish humour, the lilt in the local accent, and great ‘craic’ over a beer or coffee at a local pub, and then jot down your guide’s version of “must do Dublin.
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