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Heroes' Square

An important square containing a monumental statue complex dedicated to the Magyar chieftains and other national leaders.

TravelCurious Tip

Combine the visit with a stroll along Andrássy avenue, and try to visit both by day and night — it’s quite a different experience

Heroes’ Square was built in 1896 to mark the thousandth anniversary of Hungary. One of the major squares in Budapest, it is found at the end of Andrássy Avenue, next to City Park. It is among the most visited tourist attractions in the city, hosting the Museum of Fine Arts and the Mücsarnok Hall of Art, but it is particularly famous for its Millennial Monument.


Set in the middle of the huge plaza, the Millennial Monument is fittingly colossal. It celebrates the grand history and culture of Hungary since its inception. At its front sits a large stone cenotaph surrounded by an iron chain. The cenotaph reads: “To the memory of the heroes who gave their lives for the freedom of our people and our national independence.”


Archangel Gabriel stands on top of the central pillar, holding the holy crown and the cross of Christianity. Below are the seven chieftains of the Magyars who led the Hungarian people into the Carpathian Basin, including Árpád, who is considered the founder of the Hungarian nation. To either side important historical figures stand atop towering colonnades. Altogether, they are awe-inspiring.


Changing hands

When the monument was originally built Hungary was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, so the five spaces for statues were reserved for members of the ruling Habsburg dynasty. When the empire dissolved after WWII they were replaced with statues of Hungarian freedom fighters.


A hero’s welcome

The square is very historically significant: it was here, for example, that 250,000 Hungarians gathered to witness the reburial of Imre Nagry in 1989. Nagry was the former Primer Minister of Hungary who led the 1956 uprising against the Soviet occupation and was summarily executed in 1958. The Heroes’ Square is a patriotic emblem for the Hungarian people, so it was only appropriate that he return there.

Nearby Attractions

See all attractions in Budapest
Andrássy út
A lovely boulevard named as a World Heritage Site, lined with spectacular Neo-Renaissance mansions and luxury boutiques.
Széchenyi Baths
This immense Neo-Baroque medicinal bathing complex, the largest of its kind in Europe, is supplied by two thermal springs.
House of Terror Museum
A chilling museum, containing exhibits related to the fascist and communist regimes of the 20th century.
Memorial to the 1956 Revolution
A fascinating abstract sculpture, commemorating the anti-government uprising that occurred in 1956.
Wallenberg Holocaust Memorial
The Raoul Wallenberg Emlékpark (memory park) is located in the rear courtyard of the Dohány Street Synagogue, named for a Swedish diplomat.
Seventh District
Budapest's traditional Jewish Quarter is located in District VII, Budapest’s smallest district, which has a funky eclectic feel.

Related Tours

Visit Pest: Urban Half Day Highlights with Private Guide
In this four hour walking tour, your expert local guide will direct you to some of the most important historical and cultural sites of the Pest.

  • Explore the importance of the Danube to Pest in ancient times
  • Visit the Great Synagogue, Europe’s biggest place of worship for the Jewish faith 
  • Stroll the leafy Andrássy út boulevard, passing by the National Opera House 
  • Find out what drove Buda and Pest to unify as one large capital city
  • Discover Pest’s stunning array of architectural styles, from Turkish era to Art Nouveau
  • Snap pictures of St Stephen's Basilica, a neoclassical cathedral 
  • Enjoy the buzz of Pest, a vibrant cultural hub on the eastern banks of the Danube
  • Discover the significance of the monument at the heart of  Heroes' Square 
  • End your tour at  Széchenyi Spa, a colour-rich bathing complex in Art Nouveau style
Your tour will begin at the formidable Hungarian Parliament Building, which boasts a truly eclectic mix of architectural styles. Straddling the Danube, this stunning building is home to the Crown of St Stephen, a historically significant treasure of the Hungarian nation, bequeathed by Pope Sylvester II on Christmas Day in the year 1000. Another highlight is St Stephen’s Basilica, a neoclassical cathedral named after the first king of Hungary that is supposedly where his right hand is entombed. 

Budapest’s Great Synagogue - a statuesque landmark that ranks amongst the world’s largest places of worship for the Jewish faith - was consecrated in the city in 1859. A stroll down Andrássy út Boulevard will take you past the National Opera House built in glorious neo-Renaissance style. 

Towards the end of the boulevard, the Heroes’ Square is one of Budapest’s favourite public spaces: a popular gathering point with a monument dedicated to the Magyar (Hungarian) conquest at its heart. Your final destination on the half day tour of Pest is the largest spa in Europe, the mosaic-rich Széchenyi Spa, an immense bathing complex built in elaborate Art Nouveau style, where you have the option of purchasing tickets to explore the bubbling hot springs and steaming pools of curative waters, enjoyed throughout the centuries by around 100-million bathers.  
The Ultimate Private Full Day Highlights Tour of Budapest
In this seven hour tour with private transport, your expert local guide will direct you to some of the most important historical and cultural sites of Budapest.

  • Commence your tour on Castle Hill, which offers phenomenal panoramas of the city 
  • Visit the Great Synagogue, Europe’s biggest place of worship for the Jewish faith 
  • Stroll the leafy Andrássy út boulevard, passing by the Hungarian National Opera House 
  • Enjoy the buzz of Pest, a vibrant cultural hub on the eastern banks of the Danube
  • Discover the significance of the monument at the heart of Heroes' Square 
  • Revel in the quietude of Buda and its characterful, storied streets.
  • Find out what drove Buda and Pest to unify as one large capital city
  • Discover Budapest’s stunning array of architectural styles, from Turkish era to Art Nouveau
  • Admire the scale and finery of the Hungarian Parliament Building 
  • Admire the elegance of St Stephen's Basilica, a neoclassical cathedral 
  • Explore the importance of the Danube to Budapest since ancient times
  • End your tour at  Széchenyi Spa, a colour-rich bathing complex in Art Nouveau style
Origins of Budapest

Budapest is blessed with some truly superb, grand buildings in Gothic, Art Nouveau, Romantic, Neo-Gothic and Turkish era style: a pleasing mix of genres that draws millions of culture buffs to the city each year.  The capital of Hungary is the administrative, cultural, economic, educational, financial and trade hub of the nation. The mighty River Danube, broad and sweeping, neatly dissects the city, with the old city of Buda extending into the hills on the west bank and Pest sitting in the lowlands to the east. As Hungary’s largest metropolitan hub, Budapest boasts more diversity in its ethnicity still, combined with the historical legacies of Asiatic conquer, Mongol invasion, Ottoman siege, German control and Soviet rule. 

From Castle Hill to Heroes’ Square

Immerse yourself in the unique character of Budapest with its beautiful buildings, fairytale towers, storied streets, Hungarian culture, quirky communist-era sites and gritty spirit. Stroll some of the streets to access treasures best viewed on foot and journey via luxury transport to the city’s far-flung corners. Your expert local guide will provide a narrative to your exploration of Budapest’s most compelling historical and cultural sites.Visit Castle Hill, an elevated focal point of Budapest’s history that is home to some of the city’s most iconic medieval monuments such as the fairytale towers at the Fisherman’s Bastion and handsome Matthias Church with its royal connections. Prepare to be wowed by the sheer size and scale of the Hungarian Parliament Building, which boasts an eclectic mix mixture of architectural styles. It is here that the Crown of St Stephen, one of the most historically significant Hungarian treasures, is held on behalf of the nation.

The St Stephen’s Basilica, an elegant neoclassical cathedral named after the first king of Hungary, is the most sacred of all Catholic church in the country and took 54 years to construct, finally opening in 1905. Similarly impressive is the Great Synagogue, one of the largest places of worship of the Jewish faith in the world. In the Pest area of the city you will be able to admire the National Opera House, a temple of acoustic perfection, in a building of resplendent neo-Renaissance style. Nearby, find Heroes’ Square at the end of Andrássy Street, a neatly paved plaza built in the late 1800’s that is now topped with a monument to Hungarian conquest. Our final stop is the Széchenyi Spa, an Art Nouveau bathing complex of grand decor filled with hot bubbling pools, outside baths and whirlpools. The largest spa baths in Europe, the Széchenyi Spa boasts iconic status in Hungary and is used by people of all ages, including families, for bathing rituals in its spring-fed curative bathhouse. You are free to enjoy the spa at your leisure at the end of the tour (price not included). 
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